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Re: 318 Tri-Power

From: Mike Patterson
Email: mchr@theriver.com
Date: January 09, 2001

Comments

There are primarly two ways of setting up an induction system, build the engine around the intake,(which is pretty much what the facories did by adding bigger cams, better exhaust, and higher compression), or tunning the induction to to an existing engine (which is what most of us old hotrodders do.) What I'm getting at is that properly set up, you may not need to do any other engine modifications. I personally really like the Tri-power setups and have used them on engines ranging from stock small inch engines to relatively modified big blocks. What I've found when bolting on an after market manifold is that no matter how many carbs are run, manifold design (single vs dual plane, runner size, etc) determines how effecient the engine will run. In the particular setup you've found once it's optimised, it will likely out preform the stock setup. The key is going to be properly jetting the carbs for what the engine is (or will be) and setting the progressive linkage at a rate that will be responsive, but not too "quick". Any latter changes to the engine. i.e. exhaust, cam, compression, head work etc. will require changes to the carb jetting and linkage rate, as would be true with the stock induction. If you get to the point where you use this system I can proably send you some pictures of the linkage I'm running on the three Tri-power set ups I have (small Block chevy, big block Ford, and 354 Hemi (and you were thinking I don't have a mopar)). There are also a few tricks you may have to do to the outboard carbs to get a good Idle. Anyway as usual I've been long-winded. Good luck.

 


Last changed: May 04, 2010