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Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?
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56D500boy
Posted 2017-01-17 6:59 PM (#531610)
Subject: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?



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Talk about a can of worms.

My main focus is/was to repair/replace the driver's door panel and while I am there, to remove the door lock and get it rekeyed to the ignition lock. (I have discussed this in two other threads)

As I am doing this I removed the "Krapp" (kraft) paper door liner and peer inside the door with a trouble light. Oops. Should have not opened that can (of worms). Surface RUST

There was tar-like undercoating applied to the outer door skin in some areas (bottom half) but not others. Regardless a lot of the tar bits have spalled off and are laying in the bottom of door. There is also more than a little surface rust on the inside of the door skin. I can't fix the door panel and door lock and button things up without fixing this issue. Can't do it.

So this is my proposed strategy:

1. Vaccum out the tar bits from the bottom of the door so I can see what is what.

2. Scrape off the remaining tar bits (Or should I just leave them?) Vacuum again regardless.

3. Scuff/sand/wire brush the surface rust within reason (not aiming for bare metal). Vacuum up debris. Wipe down with mineral spirits and vacuum again.

4. Apply RustConverter (probably with a 4" foam roller and a 2" cheap bristle brush). Let dry - Probably two coats.

5. Paint the inside of the door with gray Rustoleum (OR Tremclad Rust) paint. Same idea with the 4" roller and/or 2" brush. Let dry. Maybe another coat.

6. Apply sound deadener material, i.e. a rubberized undercoating or the like, to the inside of the outer door skin to decrease sound and minimize oil canning (tinny sound when closing the door).

I know I will feel better if I do all that.

Of course there are three other cans of worms, err, I mean, doors to do probably too.

Joy.



Edited by 56D500boy 2017-01-18 1:57 AM
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mikes2nd
Posted 2017-01-17 7:25 PM (#531612 - in reply to #531610)
Subject: Re: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?


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yeah makes sense. You could use the spray can rust converter

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Phatton
Posted 2017-01-17 7:52 PM (#531615 - in reply to #531610)
Subject: Re: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?


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Instead of the Rustoleum paint, I would put Eastwoods rust encapsulator over the rust converter then the rubberized undercoating. When I use the rubberized undercoating, I usually mix in about 20% black Rustoleum paint - this helps the rubberized undercoating to dry faster.
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60 dart
Posted 2017-01-17 11:45 PM (#531631 - in reply to #531610)
Subject: Re: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?



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a zinc based paint would be a very good start . probably 3 or so spray cans would be a great help ----------------------------------------later
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60 dart
Posted 2017-01-18 1:47 AM (#531636 - in reply to #531610)
Subject: Re: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?



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http://www.ebay.com/itm/Quart-Zinc-Rich-Galvanize-Coating-/33139616...

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Quart-Brite-Zinc-Galvanize-Coating-/3319720...



Edited by 60 dart 2017-01-18 1:51 AM
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60 Imp
Posted 2017-01-18 7:58 AM (#531647 - in reply to #531610)
Subject: RE: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?


20001000
Location: North Australia
I used this Australian product throughout my Imperial's internal body panel surfaces after cleaning and brushing as you describe.

https://www.google.com.au/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&c...

As I used it i saw many examples of the product tracking into crevices, gaps, holes, overlap joints. By tracking I mean the stuff is bubbling like it is boiling and moving/running into the tightest spots and sealing up as you apply it. It took about 5 days to become touch dry.

Maybe there is an American equivalent?

One application only required. Smells bad when spraying though! I used 8 cans to cover all the suspect looking bits I could see after stripping the interior panels off, plus squirting into the inaccessible/ cant see parts. Best thing I could have done to my car I believe. The stuff was oozing out on all the external body joints. Some joints I could not see until it was dripping onto the shed floor. Cleans up good with turpentine.

I am thinking to do the underside floor and framing with it this dry season.

Steve.

Edited by 60 Imp 2017-01-18 8:00 AM
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56D500boy
Posted 2017-01-18 8:07 PM (#531708 - in reply to #531610)
Subject: RE: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?



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56D500boy - 2017-01-17 6:59 PM
So this is my proposed strategy:

1. Vacuum out the tar bits from the bottom of the door so I can see what is what.
2. Scrape off the remaining tar bits (Or should I just leave them?) Vacuum again regardless.
3. Scuff/sand/wire brush the surface rust within reason (not aiming for bare metal). Vacuum up debris. Wipe down with mineral spirits and vacuum again.
4. Apply RustConverter (probably with a 4" foam roller and a 2" cheap bristle brush). Let dry - Probably two coats.
5. Paint the inside of the door with gray Rustoleum (OR Tremclad Rust) paint. Same idea with the 4" roller and/or 2" brush. Let dry. Maybe another coat.
6. Apply sound deadener material, i.e. a rubberized undercoating or the like, to the inside of the outer door skin to decrease sound and minimize oil canning (tinny sound when closing the door).


Started on Steps 1 and 2 today. Some of the undercoating/deadener tar (hard as a rock) chips off easily other bits will require more effort. I was encouraged to find that under the areas where the tar was tight to the door skin, the metal is still shiny new. Where it was loose or missing (fell off years ago), there is surface rust.

Kind of sad that Chrysler and the others couldn't afford to paint the inside of the doors before they applied the tar. I guess they were working on the "built-in obsolescence" theory of industrial design were rusting out was acceptable because people didn't want to keep their cars forever anyway, move on to the next new thing when the first one gets old and ugly. (I'm talking cars here, not wives BTW).

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59 in Calif
Posted 2017-01-18 8:21 PM (#531711 - in reply to #531610)
Subject: Re: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?


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I had the same problem. And did as you did, but in step #6 I used spray cans of Rust Seal. Like the stuff they sell on TV ads. I got it at Home Depot, same stuff but a lot cheaper. Makes it a lot easier if you have the windows and door latch out. Jerry
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56D500boy
Posted 2017-01-20 11:22 PM (#531921 - in reply to #531708)
Subject: RE: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?



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56D500boy - 2017-01-17 6:59 PM So this is my proposed strategy:

1. Vacuum out the tar bits from the bottom of the door so I can see what is what.
2. Scrape off the remaining tar bits (Or should I just leave them?) Vacuum again regardless.
3. Scuff/sand/wire brush the surface rust within reason (not aiming for bare metal). Vacuum up debris. Wipe down with mineral spirits and vacuum again.
4. Apply RustConverter (probably with a 4" foam roller and a 2" cheap bristle brush). Let dry - Probably two coats.
5. Paint the inside of the door with gray Rustoleum (OR Tremclad Rust) paint. Same idea with the 4" roller and/or 2" brush. Let dry. Maybe another coat.
6. Apply sound deadener material, i.e. a rubberized undercoating or the like, to the inside of the outer door skin to decrease sound and minimize oil canning (tinny sound when closing the door).


Worked on Steps 2 and 3 today. Had to include spraying a solvent into the cavity where the tar was still attached to the outer door skin, to soften some of the tar cr*p and get it to chip off. Then I used a very long flat blade screwdriver (from a cheap set), a 1" putty knife and a Richards brand scraper multi-tool and made quite a bit of progress (maybe 55% done). Used a hand held BBQ grill pad to remove small bits of tar and rust.

Got curious about the spring wire clips that I could see at the bottom of the door holding on the bottom door rubber gasket Laying on the garage floor I was a bit astounded. Not clips, more like the gasket was wire-stitched to the door. Spied some rust under the rubber so the gasket will have to come off ASAP. Not sure how to get it back on. Maybe just glue. (??)



Edited by 56D500boy 2017-01-20 11:23 PM
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59 in Calif
Posted 2017-01-21 11:09 AM (#531942 - in reply to #531610)
Subject: Re: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?


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I tried to find that bottom of door clips for the seal. No such thing made anymore and the new repo seal won't accomodate a good old wire clip. So guess I will use weather strip adhesive. Jerry
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56D500boy
Posted 2017-01-21 7:01 PM (#531966 - in reply to #531942)
Subject: Re: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?



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56D500boy - 2017-01-20 11:22 PM Got curious about the spring wire clips that I could see at the bottom of the door holding on the bottom door rubber gasket Laying on the garage floor I was a bit astounded. Not clips, more like the gasket was wire-stitched to the door. Spied some rust under the rubber so the gasket will have to come off ASAP. Not sure how to get it back on. Maybe just glue. (??)



59 in Calif - 2017-01-21 11:09 AM
I tried to find that bottom of door clips for the seal. No such thing made anymore and the new repo seal won't accomodate a good old wire clip. So guess I will use weather strip adhesive. Jerry


Worked on the inside of the door again today for an hour or so. The "tar" seems to be impervious to PB Blaster and Mopar Combustion Chamber Spray cleaner (some wicked solvent). But still, I made progress, probably another hour or so unless somebody suggests a BTDT solvent that will soften the "tar".

When I got bored with scraping tar, I investigated the door gasket a bit more, specifically the wire that helped hold the gasket at the bottom of the door to the door. It looks like it was once one continuous wire with "loops" that went through the rubber gasket and holes in the door. Looks like the spacing was every four inches. Wire looks like 18 gauge or so. Likely possible to hand bend some wire to recreate the original. It would help hold the gasket at the bottom of the door. Gasket is still glued to the door down there.

There was a bit more surface rust on the exterior of the bottom of the door than I hoped for. But still, no perforations. I will RustStop it, paint with a Tremclad rust primer and then paint with body colour paint (actually two colours) even at the bottom of the door.



Edited by 56D500boy 2017-01-21 7:05 PM




(56DodgeDoorBottomGasketWireClips.jpg)



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56D500boy
Posted 2017-01-22 7:52 PM (#532068 - in reply to #531966)
Subject: Re: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?



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Took the day off today. Cold and rainy out, not much better in my unheated garage.

I was thinking, I wonder if GUNK brand Engine Degreaser would work on the "Tar" that is on the inside of the outside door panel. Have to get some and try it.

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gwaggoner
Posted 2017-01-23 10:16 AM (#532106 - in reply to #532068)
Subject: Re: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?


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When I stripped the undercoating on my car I found that PB Blaster over spray on the undercoating had softened it and made removal easier.
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Phatton
Posted 2017-01-23 3:59 PM (#532136 - in reply to #531610)
Subject: Re: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?


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Try a hair dryer or heat gun to soften the undercoating for removal. As it gets warm it scrapes pretty easily.
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ttotired
Posted 2017-01-23 5:35 PM (#532142 - in reply to #531610)
Subject: Re: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?



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Yep, as above, use heat, just not to much that you hurt the paint outside

Not going to say it will fall off, but it will be much easier than how your doing it

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56D500boy
Posted 2017-01-23 6:15 PM (#532146 - in reply to #532142)
Subject: Re: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?



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ttotired - 2017-01-23 5:35 PM Yep, as above, use heat, just not to much that you hurt the paint outside
Not going to say it will fall off, but it will be much easier than how your doing it


Thanks. I understand the advantages of using a heat gun. And the potential oopses.

The biggest problem would be getting the heat gun inside the door at the right location.

I will try. Just bought a better scraper to try too.

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56D500boy
Posted 2017-01-23 7:50 PM (#532154 - in reply to #532146)
Subject: Re: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?



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56D500boy - 2017-01-23 6:15 PM
ttotired - 2017-01-23 5:35 PM Yep, as above, use heat, just not to much that you hurt the paint outside
Not going to say it will fall off, but it will be much easier than how your doing it

Thanks. I understand the advantages of using a heat gun. And the potential oopses.
The biggest problem would be getting the heat gun inside the door at the right location.
I will try. Just bought a better scraper to try too. :)


This is the scraper. Used some GUNK engine degreaser - meh. And then I tried my 1200W heat gun on MEDIUM. Definitely worked with new scraper. (See below).

So now I am finished Step 3 and ready for Step 4 tomorrow, assuming the weather is decent(ish)

1. Vaccum out the tar bits from the bottom of the door so I can see what is what. DONE
2. Scrape off the remaining tar bits (Or should I just leave them?) Vacuum again regardless. DONE
3. Scuff/sand/wire brush the surface rust within reason (not aiming for bare metal). Vacuum up debris. Wipe down with mineral spirits and vacuum again. DONE lots of bare shiny metal too.

4. Apply RustConverter (probably with a 4" foam roller and a 2" cheap bristle brush). Let dry - Probably two coats. I THINK I WILL TRY WITH A SPRAY BOMB FIRST
5. Paint the inside of the door with gray Rustoleum (OR Tremclad Rust) paint. Same idea with the 4" roller and/or 2" brush. Let dry. Maybe another coat.
6. Apply sound deadener material, i.e. a rubberized undercoating or the like, to the inside of the outer door skin to decrease sound and minimize oil canning (tinny sound when closing the door).



Edited by 56D500boy 2017-01-23 7:54 PM
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56D500boy
Posted 2017-01-24 10:10 AM (#532190 - in reply to #532154)
Subject: Re: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?



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Forgot to mention that with Step 3 done and all (99.999%) of the tar off the inside of the outer door skin, the door sounds a bit like a Caribbean steel drum. Definitely "tinny" when you shut the door. Before I started (with the tar still on), it shut with a nice strong "thunk". Not bad value engineering: the "sound of quality" for about $0.25 of tar/undercoating.

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56D500boy
Posted 2017-01-24 8:37 PM (#532246 - in reply to #532154)
Subject: Re: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?



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56D500boy - 2017-01-23 7:50 PM
4. Apply RustConverter (probably with a 4" foam roller and a 2" cheap bristle brush). Let dry - Probably two coats. I THINK I WILL TRY WITH A SPRAY BOMB FIRST
5. Paint the inside of the door with gray Rustoleum (OR Tremclad Rust) paint. Same idea with the 4" roller and/or 2" brush. Let dry. Maybe another coat.
6. Apply sound deadener material, i.e. a rubberized undercoating or the like, to the inside of the outer door skin to decrease sound and minimize oil canning (tinny sound when closing the door).


Got to Step 4, first coat today. Used brush on SEM Rust Stop (a liquid rust converter) on the bigger, accessible, patches of surface rust. Used a spray bomb of Rust Check brand Rust Converter for areas that I couldn't get at with my brush. I'll give things a second coat tomorrow. Can't wait to get to Step 5 and make the door all pretty inside.

I should have said that probably 75% of the inside surface of the outer door skin had zero rust once I got that tar cr*p off. The other 25% was surface rust, some areas thicker that other areas.


Edited by 56D500boy 2017-01-24 10:35 PM




(RustConverter.jpg)



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56D500boy
Posted 2017-07-13 10:50 AM (#544102 - in reply to #532246)
Subject: Re: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?



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56D500boy - 2017-01-24 8:37 PM
56D500boy - 2017-01-23 7:50 PM
4. Apply RustConverter (probably with a 4" foam roller and a 2" cheap bristle brush). Let dry - Probably two coats. I THINK I WILL TRY WITH A SPRAY BOMB FIRST
5. Paint the inside of the door with gray Rustoleum (OR Tremclad Rust) paint. Same idea with the 4" roller and/or 2" brush. Let dry. Maybe another coat.
6. Apply sound deadener material, i.e. a rubberized undercoating or the like, to the inside of the outer door skin to decrease sound and minimize oil canning (tinny sound when closing the door).

Got to Step 4, first coat today. Used brush on SEM Rust Stop (a liquid rust converter) on the bigger, accessible, patches of surface rust. Used a spray bomb of Rust Check brand Rust Converter for areas that I couldn't get at with my brush. I'll give things a second coat tomorrow. Can't wait to get to Step 5 and make the door all pretty inside.
I should have said that probably 75% of the inside surface of the outer door skin had zero rust once I got that tar cr*p off. The other 25% was surface rust, some areas thicker that other areas.


56D500boy - 2017-01-24 10:10 AM Forgot to mention that with Step 3 done and all (99.999%) of the tar off the inside of the outer door skin, the door sounds a bit like a Caribbean steel drum. Definitely "tinny" when you shut the door. Before I started (with the tar still on), it shut with a nice strong "thunk". Not bad value engineering: the "sound of quality" for about $0.25 of tar/undercoating. ;)


I haven't been working on that door for months but I forgot to update. In the end, after the SEM Rust Stop, I painted the inside of the door with Zero Rust spray paint. That sealed everything up very nicely, thank you very much. And I left it to work on (many) other things.

Yesterday, now that my engine bay has been "betterified" ( = made to look better than when I bought the car), I got back to the door, to install new window tracks and cat's whiskers. First job was to kill the steel drum sound of the door. I had some real Dynamat from my rear parcel shelf project so I cut one of those pieces on the length, removed the paper backing and worked the pieces into the door through the big opening and then reached through the small opening to grab the other end to manipulate the pieces into place. The butyl rubber tried to stick on its own but it was easily pulled off and the position readjusted until I was happy. Then I just pressed the dynamat down by hand. Pull two of those half strips and a smaller scrap strip in. Steel drum sound is gone and the door shuts with a nice THUNK. (Instead of a big BOIIINNNGGG)

WARNING: The skin of the Dynamat is a thin metal and it will cut you (I only felt the cut later when I washed up for supper). Wear gloves (at least latex) when handling the Dynamat.


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57burb
Posted 2017-07-13 5:33 PM (#544114 - in reply to #544102)
Subject: Re: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?



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I know it's an old thread and you've gotten good results with your techniques. But I would not recommend spraying Gunk engine cleaner inside of a car. That stuff is basically diesel fuel and stinks forever accordingly.
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56D500boy
Posted 2017-07-13 8:09 PM (#544118 - in reply to #544114)
Subject: Re: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?



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57burb - 2017-07-13 5:33 PM I know it's an old thread and you've gotten good results with your techniques. But I would not recommend spraying Gunk engine cleaner inside of a car. That stuff is basically diesel fuel and stinks forever accordingly.


I probably won't do that again either but that occurred back in January and the inside of the door has been open since then. No smell now. Thanks for the future hint.

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56D500boy
Posted 2017-07-18 11:13 AM (#544327 - in reply to #531921)
Subject: RE: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?



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56D500boy - 2017-01-20 11:22 PM Got curious about the spring wire clips that I could see at the bottom of the door holding on the bottom door rubber gasket Laying on the garage floor I was a bit astounded. Not clips, more like the gasket was wire-stitched to the door. Spied some rust under the rubber so the gasket will have to come off ASAP. Not sure how to get it back on. Maybe just glue. (??)


This is what I pulled off:



This is what I found in that 1957 Firedome 4 dr hardtop eBay advert (nice what seems to be rust-free door).



Edited by 56D500boy 2017-07-18 11:16 AM




(DoorGasketAttachment57Desoto.jpg)



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51coronet
Posted 2017-07-18 12:13 PM (#544330 - in reply to #531610)
Subject: Re: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?


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I think a lot of us are familiar with this if we have opened up our cars. I am working on a 57 2 door imperial that had rusted rockers from in front of the door hinge area all the way to the rear tire well. I use por15, its a little pricey but works good on surface rust. I used an hvlp gun to hit the insides of the doors, catch is this gun has hoses to the paint container so I can get it in there and spray real good. The rockers are hollow and were full of rust chunks. Vacuumed all that crap out (before the welded in repair)
sealed what I could with por15 then said hmm why even allow moisture to ever get in there again. I filled them with spray foam, 3 cans per side and it got front to back. Stuffed some cardboard in the drip holes to keep it inside. Not sure on other cars but the rear tires will forcibly fling water and road junk into the rockers if there is an opening and if its an imperial it has an opening back there that's just getting bigger and bigger. The rust just clogs the drip holes so the problem just stacks onto itself.

I will go back and drill a few holes for drainage for the rear windows since they can no longer drain. (rear windows drained into the rockers and rockers were supposed to drain into the street) I don't feel this is a bad idea since water getting inside the rockers has obviously been bad. Now the rear window drains will be a straight shot to the street going through the foamed area of the rocker without filling it up with water.

The other areas that will be getting similar treatment are the wheel wells from inside the trunk area. Moisture can get trapped between the well and outer body skin and form rust there which it has in a few areas. Again no reason to even allow moisture to get in those areas so I will try and get paint in there and then dump some liquid foam I have to fill it in. Its a tight area but really should be sealed up on any car that shares this design. The rust will start just above the wheel well lip (looking at the exterior) and inside the wheel well where it is 2 pieces of sheet metal joined together forming an air gap inside the trunk. If only all the sheet metal was coated inside and out we would have more survivors.
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56D500boy
Posted 2018-09-09 2:36 PM (#569858 - in reply to #544330)
Subject: Re: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?



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Thanks for the suggestions. I am thinking about using some spray foam in the area between the outer fender and the wheel well to seal off the trunk from the cabin even more than I have already.

As for the rockers, I have previously vacuumed them out through the large (1"?) holes under the sill plates with my "special" nozzle (1/2" PEX pipe taped to the inside of a normal shop-vac nozzle) and then sprayed Rust Converter through those holes (I think 3 places). I would like to find a Ziebart type place to get a more thorough spraying of Rust Converter inside the rocker. My out sides are good - one has been previously done so I don't plan to do too much to them.

Back to the door story...
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56D500boy
Posted 2018-09-09 2:49 PM (#569859 - in reply to #569858)
Subject: Moving on to the 3rd door



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I wanted to paint the outside of my front passenger door (the lower light blue part) but I didn't want to encounter surprises, i.e. small perforations from the inside. Plus the inner door panel needed some fixing (front bottom). So the inner door panel had to come off. Naturally this exposed the inevitable surface rust on the inside of the door. This time it was not a surprise like it was with my first (driver's) door so I expected it and knew what to do.

So with the panel off, I chucked up my wire cup brush in my 18V drill and went at it. Inside and really inside. The old tar stuff was coming off so I go my red scraper out and removed was much as I could with out too much bleeding (lots of scrapes on my arms even though they were covered while I was reaching in there). Another round with the wire brush. Some vacuuming of debris and another round of scraping and wire brush. Took about an hour and then I called it "Done" (enough).

The next step was to spray as much as possible with Rust Check brand Rust Converter. When that was dry (the next day), I sprayed the inside cavity of the door with Zero Rust paint and the outside (inner) with Tremclad (Rustoleum) Rust Paint. Two coats of each.

When that was dry, I took a sheet of Eastwood X-mat low profile (like Dynamat - only cheaper) and cut down the middle (the long way) and then applied to two pieces (one at a time) to the inner side of the outer door skin to kill the steel drum effect that resulted when I removed all the OE tar cr@p. I was going to paint over the X-mat but decided to leave it visible (it will never be seen once the door panel is back on any way).

Some photos of that process:





(56DodgeRightFrontDoor_1_AsFound.jpg)



(56DodgeRightFrontDoor_2_ArmrestAndHandlesRemoved.jpg)



(56DodgeRightFrontDoor_3_DoorPanelOffExposingOEInnerLiner.jpg)



(56DodgeRightFrontDoor_4_InnerLinerAndHandleSpringDetails.jpg)



(56DodgeRightFrontDoor_5_InnerLinerStuffOff.jpg)



(56DodgeRightFrontDoor_6_DoorCleanedAndPainted.jpg)



(56DodgeRightFrontDoor_7_DoorCleanedAndPainted_WithXMat.jpg)



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Attachments 56DodgeRightFrontDoor_1_AsFound.jpg (234KB - 14 downloads)
Attachments 56DodgeRightFrontDoor_2_ArmrestAndHandlesRemoved.jpg (231KB - 20 downloads)
Attachments 56DodgeRightFrontDoor_3_DoorPanelOffExposingOEInnerLiner.jpg (202KB - 17 downloads)
Attachments 56DodgeRightFrontDoor_4_InnerLinerAndHandleSpringDetails.jpg (182KB - 17 downloads)
Attachments 56DodgeRightFrontDoor_5_InnerLinerStuffOff.jpg (205KB - 15 downloads)
Attachments 56DodgeRightFrontDoor_6_DoorCleanedAndPainted.jpg (208KB - 24 downloads)
Attachments 56DodgeRightFrontDoor_7_DoorCleanedAndPainted_WithXMat.jpg (217KB - 17 downloads)
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rebel
Posted 2018-09-09 4:21 PM (#569863 - in reply to #569859)
Subject: RE: Moving on to the 3rd door


Veteran

Posts: 193
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Location: Western Colorado
Good job Dave! One thing you might think about is spraying/coating the perimeter of the X-mat with a good undercoating. It you don't have the X-mat stitched down really good, water might get behind it and cause a rust issue. If you seal the perimeter you eliminate that chance. You might also check on a product called Second Skin, Damplifier Pro. It is like DynaMat except its cheaper and it is not bright aluminum but rather has a flat black coating. Makes it nicer in an area like under carpet etc. where you might see the edge of what's under the covering.
On the weather strip wire retainers: I have used piano wire to remake these retainers. At one time we had a local company that repaired pianos that would just give me the wires that they had replaced. Guitar strings also work well.
I also found some crystal clear plastic at Hobby Lobby to make the water shield behind the door panels. It is used to make covers for pillows, seat covers, etc. It doesn't have an oily surface, like construction type plastic, so it holds tape really well.
Nice work! Keep up the posts!
Bob
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mikes2nd
Posted 2018-09-09 8:27 PM (#569878 - in reply to #531610)
Subject: Re: Surface rust inside doors - Is this a good strategy?


Expert

Posts: 3134
2000100010025
I will be cavity waxing the bottom of my door.

I typically got eastwood but i recently bought a gallon of "undercoating in a can" really bad name but hey...
I will let you know if they are better than Eastwood.

Eastwood is double the price and for all i know it may be eastwood.

Eastwood does have a "beige" clear version.

https://petroleumservicecompany.com/undercoating-in-a-can-2/


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