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Sonoramic60
Posted 2019-09-29 8:53 PM (#588136)
Subject: Interesting Comments


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Lads --
Weekend last, I took the Big-Tailed Beast (my '60 Fury SonoRamic Commando equipped '60 Fury) to a car show at Pikes Peak International Raceway. It was quite an affair and I understand they had over a thousand cars there. Surprisingly, there were as many resto-mods as there were pure hot rods, though triple-nickle Chevies predominated. The Beast didn't win anything, as expected, but it sure attracted attention -- one '57 Belaire even moved from next to us because the owner thought he was being neglected.
I did take it on the 1/8 mile strip but I really have no idea how I did. I'm a product of the old days with the flagman and I just can't cope with those lights. Also, in my day, we had timing slips and I completely forgot to look at the results posted on the lights. Don't get old.
There were a couple of interesting comments, though:
"Sir, is that an early version of the deactivization principle where only half of the cylinders fire to operate more economically?" "Nope. She's running on the primary two-barrels of EACH carb all the time until I put my foot into it so can watch the fuel level go down as the MPH goes up."
" Does that Slant-6 have an aluminum block?" "No, it's actually two cast iron slant-4's coupled together much the same as Chrysler did on their 5-bank (five 251 CID straight sixes arranged around a single shaft) engine on the M4A4 Sherman tank in WWII."
People are interesting.
Joe Godec
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DaTow'd
Posted 2019-09-29 8:59 PM (#588137 - in reply to #588136)
Subject: Re: Interesting Comments


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Quote
She's running on the primary two-barrels of EACH carb all the time until I put my foot into it so can watch the fuel level go down as the MPH goes up."
classic got a good laugh out of me
cheers
Hank
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58 DESOTOS RULE
Posted 2019-09-29 11:52 PM (#588143 - in reply to #588136)
Subject: RE: Interesting Comments



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" Does that Slant-6 have an aluminum block?" "No, it's actually two cast iron slant-4's coupled together much the same as Chrysler did on their 5-bank (five 251 CID straight sixes arranged around a single shaft) engine on the M4A4 Sherman tank in WWII."

Did that person actually mistake your engine for a Slant 6? The Leaning Tower of Power has some racing history, but it would have been pretty hard to confuse it with a V-8 I would have thought. By the way, nice reference to the WW II tank engine. I have never seen one in real life, but I have seen pictures, and that looks like a complex design for the day. 

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Doctor DeSoto
Posted 2019-09-30 12:19 AM (#588145 - in reply to #588143)
Subject: RE: Interesting Comments



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The Dumas Awards comments are the best part of going to car shows. The chest pounders
and trophy princesses and cookie cutter cars are nauseating.

Seeking amusement wherever it may sprout up, I love the absurd stuff the ignorants, blowhards,
and silly people have to impart.

In five years of ownership, I have been asked FOUR times if I am the original owner:







(26 731 2016 aug 01 copy (1).jpg)



Attachments
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Attachments 26 731 2016 aug 01 copy (1).jpg (123KB - 18 downloads)
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56D500boy
Posted 2019-09-30 1:32 AM (#588151 - in reply to #588143)
Subject: RE: Interesting Comments



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58 DESOTOS RULE - 2019-09-29 8:52 PM By the way, nice reference to the WW II tank engine. I have never seen one in real life, but I have seen pictures, and that looks like a complex design for the day.
.

Me neither. Just photos like these, 5 241 cu in Chrysler flat head sixes geared together:





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60 Imp
Posted 2019-09-30 7:20 AM (#588160 - in reply to #588136)
Subject: RE: Interesting Comments


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Location: North Australia
That is classic Joe, people are interesting (some less interesting than others!).

The world has changed, too quick even for us youngsters! (I'm 54 in a couple weeks).

Good on ya for keeping patient.

Its all about Smiles/gallon, not Miles/gallon.

Steve.

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57burb
Posted 2019-09-30 1:18 PM (#588174 - in reply to #588137)
Subject: Re: Interesting Comments



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Doctor DeSoto - 2019-09-29 11:19 PM

Seeking amusement wherever it may sprout up, I love the absurd stuff the ignorants, blowhards,
and silly people have to impart.

It's serendipitous that you bring this up, with a photo of your T. Just yesterday I was walking through the parking lot of the local hardware store, and two great big guys blasted through in a stock '28-29 Ford roadster pick up! Cool! Of course I had to chat them up.

Turns out it was a father and his son. They didn't know much about the little Model A; the dad had just bought it the day before from an elderly neighbor. It was a bit rough but obviously reliable enough to drive. At 6'4, he was telling me how difficult it is to use the pedals. I bet! His boy was 6'6 and was having a lot of trouble just getting out of it. The dad commented he was mostly into air cooled VWs but he thought the RPU was neat. Eh, okay. Then he said the reason they called them a "pick up" is because they arrived in a big crate that a buyer "picked up" at the train station to be assembled at home.

Uh...

Before I could respond, he pointed at the bottom and said it's "made out of wood", and that Ford repurposed the crate for "all that." I know this truck's frame and suspension are all made out of steel, and that the body uses some wood, and that it was a complete vehicle when it was sold new, but I didn't bother correcting him. LOL. I mean - it's his truck and I'm not gonna start an argument over his baloney, but unfortunately we're at a point where even some owners are ignorant about the old cars they are driving. Not a good outlook for the hobby...
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57chizler
Posted 2019-09-30 1:25 PM (#588175 - in reply to #588136)
Subject: RE: Interesting Comments



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I used to drive an Avanti II as a daily driver and it elicited lots of strange comments. If I was feeling frisky, I'd do like Joe did and spout nonsence to counter their nonsense.



(Rs.jpg)



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Attachments Rs.jpg (81KB - 17 downloads)
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Doctor DeSoto
Posted 2019-10-04 2:54 AM (#588380 - in reply to #588175)
Subject: RE: Interesting Comments



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With a bunch of work, I have made my truck capable of doing 35-40 mph,
from it's original 15-20. Still, that is not fast enough for some people, and
on that rare occasion, I get someone really steamed for going "so slow".

This summer I got one such gem, and she gave me an earful, about how
"that stupid thing belongs in a museum, and not on the road". I let her run
with it, and then told her this was a very special truck. The original owner
was Abe Lincoln, and it was given to me by the Lincoln family. She never
blinked. She just went on about that was all the more reason that it shouldn't
be out on the road, holding up traffic. As I never drive on roads I cannot do the
speed limit on, her whole point was kinda stupid. Abe would not have approved.

I can only hope she ranted to her friends about some axxhole out driving Abe
Lincoln's truck.
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plymouth
Posted 2019-10-04 8:05 AM (#588382 - in reply to #588380)
Subject: RE: Interesting Comments



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Doctor DeSoto - 2019-10-04 1:54 AM

With a bunch of work, I have made my truck capable of doing 35-40 mph,
from it's original 15-20. Still, that is not fast enough for some people, and
on that rare occasion, I get someone really steamed for going "so slow".

This summer I got one such gem, and she gave me an earful, about how
"that stupid thing belongs in a museum, and not on the road". I let her run
with it, and then told her this was a very special truck. The original owner
was Abe Lincoln, and it was given to me by the Lincoln family. She never
blinked. She just went on about that was all the more reason that it shouldn't
be out on the road, holding up traffic. As I never drive on roads I cannot do the
speed limit on, her whole point was kinda stupid. Abe would not have approved.

I can only hope she ranted to her friends about some axxhole out driving Abe
Lincoln's truck.

Can people truly be that out of touch with reality? That would be about the same as if I had an old Nokia phone and people were genuinely believing it belonged to FDR. I suppose that some people believe that the world started when they were born and everything before their time is irrelevant.
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Skelly1958
Posted 2019-10-04 9:39 AM (#588384 - in reply to #588174)
Subject: Re: Interesting Comments


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I enjoyed this Model A story. I grew up in a Model A family (between my Dad and two of his brothers there were 8 Model A's) so I've heard many stories - some intriguing and some utter nonsense. I'm 6' and it's a little cramped for me when driving a Tudor sedan so I can't imagine how those two big guys crammed themselves in there, with the roadsters being the shortest on interior space.

He wasn't totally wrong on the floorboards. I've done a lot of research and read a lot of books about Model A's and Henry Ford. As many of us have learned from reading about Henry, he was a VERY frugal, and somewhat eccentric man. Obviously the vehicles did not come in crates for home assembly but I did read that Henry specified the crate size from outside suppliers so the factory could re-purpose the boards for use as floor boards in the model A. The early models used solid boards while the later models used plywood.
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60 dart
Posted 2019-10-04 4:03 PM (#588403 - in reply to #588382)
Subject: RE: Interesting Comments



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plymouth - 2019-10-04 8:05 AM

Doctor DeSoto - 2019-10-04 1:54 AM

With a bunch of work, I have made my truck capable of doing 35-40 mph,
from it's original 15-20. Still, that is not fast enough for some people, and
on that rare occasion, I get someone really steamed for going "so slow".

This summer I got one such gem, and she gave me an earful, about how
"that stupid thing belongs in a museum, and not on the road". I let her run
with it, and then told her this was a very special truck. The original owner
was Abe Lincoln, and it was given to me by the Lincoln family. She never
blinked. She just went on about that was all the more reason that it shouldn't
be out on the road, holding up traffic. As I never drive on roads I cannot do the
speed limit on, her whole point was kinda stupid. Abe would not have approved.

I can only hope she ranted to her friends about some axxhole out driving Abe
Lincoln's truck.

Can people truly be that out of touch with reality? That would be about the same as if I had an old Nokia phone and people were genuinely believing it belonged to FDR. I suppose that some people believe that the world started when they were born and everything before their time is irrelevant.





brown cows and chocolate milk would be a great example -----------------------------------------------later
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58coronet
Posted 2019-10-04 8:45 PM (#588417 - in reply to #588136)
Subject: Re: Interesting Comments


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I also own a Model A, a 1930 Town Sedan. This is a large (for a Model A) car, and I still had to modify the seat tracks and bend the shifter to drive it. I'M 6'2" and there is no way I could drive it in stock form.
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56D500boy
Posted 2019-10-04 9:18 PM (#588420 - in reply to #588417)
Subject: Re: Interesting Comments



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58coronet - 2019-10-04 5:45 PM
I also own a Model A, a 1930 Town Sedan. This is a large (for a Model A) car, and I still had to modify the seat tracks and bend the shifter to drive it. I'M 6'2" and there is no way I could drive it in stock form.


I can't find a good source of height data (with percentiles) but it looks like the average height of a male in 1930 was about 5'8" in the US. Average male heights in the US apparently peaked in 1996 at about 5'10" and have been declining since then.

REFERENCE: https://time.com/4423803/how-tall-100-years-height/

Regardless, I think 6'2" would be outside the 95th percentile for design (if Ford actually used that kind of information in their designs in 1930).

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Doctor DeSoto
Posted 2019-10-05 10:49 PM (#588458 - in reply to #588420)
Subject: Re: Interesting Comments



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Nevermind the height factor. Americans have become a wallowing pod of fat f$#k whales
since 1920. Can't tell you how many guys who own trucks like mine bellyache about the
cramped quarters. Granted, the interior is about as ergonomic as a phone booth, but there
is plenty of room for the height-weight proportionate man under 6 foot tall.

Face it, if it was good enough for Abraham Lincoln, it's good enough for me !
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57burb
Posted 2019-10-06 5:49 PM (#588482 - in reply to #588384)
Subject: Re: Interesting Comments



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Skelly1958 - 2019-10-04 8:39 AM

He wasn't totally wrong on the floorboards. I've done a lot of research and read a lot of books about Model A's and Henry Ford. As many of us have learned from reading about Henry, he was a VERY frugal, and somewhat eccentric man. Obviously the vehicles did not come in crates for home assembly but I did read that Henry specified the crate size from outside suppliers so the factory could re-purpose the boards for use as floor boards in the model A. The early models used solid boards while the later models used plywood.

Some truth there; Ford had a machine that could join scraps from crates (or any other source of usable wood). Eventually that wood 'product' was approved for use as floor boards and seat frames in Ford cars, and was also used throughout the plants too. And we all know about Kingsford briquettes being made out of the mill waste from Ford's various wood processing plants. I'm sure there were many more anecdotes of Ford repurposing byproducts, he seemed to get a kick out of that.

But building the truck out of the crate it came in is a kindergarten "whisper game" version of the real story.
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60 Imp
Posted 2019-10-08 7:08 AM (#588558 - in reply to #588136)
Subject: RE: Interesting Comments


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Doc, you need to upgrade to something bigger and more modern for hauling. How about this?
Steve.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/1930-Other-Makes/123932007201?hash=item1cda...

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Doctor DeSoto
Posted 2019-10-10 2:33 AM (#588650 - in reply to #588558)
Subject: RE: Interesting Comments



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That's awesome ! Would make an excellent commuter vehicle for Seattle
rush hour traffic. Just let those wannabe stunt drivers tangle with Mr. Mack !
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