NOS Parts - a definition
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NOS Parts - a definition



Thanks John for this info.  Thought there might be others that are new to
the list that would appreciate your explanation.

Hal Coble
1963 Crown Imperial Southampton
Georgia

-----Original Message-----
From: JR6@xxxxxxx [mailto:JR6@xxxxxxx]
Sent: Wednesday, February 12, 2003 1:43 AM
To: hal@xxxxxxxxx
Subject: Re: NOS Parts - a definition


Hal,

As I understand the designation NOS it means "new original stock".  These
are
original parts that simply sat on the shelf waiting for a use that never
came.  When dealers and part houses divest themselves of such stock
(unsold),
the designation NOS follows the part. Clearinghouses and other parts vendors
then stock these parts as a commodity that will either rise in value (become
scarce), justifying their investment, or fall (oversupply), which creates a
readily available part that is cheap for us to buy. Clearly the NOS parts
were created as contemporaries to our vehicles and age at a similar rate.
Metal components may oxidize somewhat and  rubber and plastic parts may
degrade depending upon the packaging, exposure to moisture, sunlight, oils,
etc.

Aftermarket parts are either designed by third parties or they have been
made
to original specifications by brand name manufacturers. However, slight
differences in materials and tolerances do creep if only to make the part
more adaptable to an ever expanding set of applications. Enhanced
interchangability is frequently attempted and the part becomes more saleable
to a wider audience.  If the aftermarket people get it right, there is no
problem for us in actual use.  If they get it wrong, end users get to
discover where the part went wrong and try to re-engineer it - hence the
expression "modify, modify".  You can see why there is a strong preference
to
acquire NOS parts in critical applications even if the parts are older and
experience environmental degradation.

John

P.S.  Since this is a good question to ask and I've provided a pretty
comprehensive definition, you might want to post this message to the rest of
the members.  No doubt there are others as keen as you to have this
information.

In a message dated 2/11/03 11:26:27, hal@xxxxxxxxx writes:

<< Thanks John.  I am 47 and have worked so hard all of my life that I have
never had time for a hobby or to learn about cars.  I am now having a mid
life crisis, I guess, and am loving my new passion.  One more question:
When looking for parts, of what is NOS an abbreviation?  Thanks again.

Hal >>






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